My name is Colton. Science teaches me. Humor maintains me. Music composes me. Also, I like the Oak Ridge Boys.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from sci-universe  858 notes

Neptune comes closest to Earth on August 26, 2013. This occurs when the planet makes its closest approach to the point directly opposite to the Sun in the sky – an event called opposition. Since the Sun reaches its greatest distance below the horizon at midnight, the point opposite to it is highest in the sky at the same time.


Even at opposition, however, Neptune, the eighth planet outward from the Sun, is not all that close and bright. So you’ll need binoculars or a telescope.
How to find Neptune? This will help you to make sure the position of the planet in your location.

Neptune comes closest to Earth on August 26, 2013. This occurs when the planet makes its closest approach to the point directly opposite to the Sun in the sky – an event called opposition. Since the Sun reaches its greatest distance below the horizon at midnight, the point opposite to it is highest in the sky at the same time.

Even at opposition, however, Neptune, the eighth planet outward from the Sun, is not all that close and bright. So you’ll need binoculars or a telescope.

How to find Neptune? This will help you to make sure the position of the planet in your location.

1. There are plenty of ways to enter a pool. The stairs is not one of them.

2. Never cancel dinner plans by text message.

3. Don’t knock it ‘til you try it.

4. If a street performer makes you stop walking, you owe him a buck.

5. Always use ‘we’ when referring to your home team or your government.

6. When entrusted with a secret, keep it.

7. Don’t underestimate free throws in a game of ‘horse’.

8. Just because you can doesn’t mean you should.

9. Don’t dumb it down.

10. You only get one chance to notice a new haircut.

11. If you’re staying more than one night, unpack.

12. Never park in front of a bar.

13. Expect the seat in front of you to recline. Prepare accordingly.

14. Keep a picture of your first fish, first car, and first boy/girlfriend.

15. Hold your heroes to a high standard.

16. A suntan is earned, not bought.

17. Never lie to your doctor.

18. All guns are loaded.

19. Don’t mention sunburns. Believe me, they know.

20. The best way to show thanks is to wear it. Even if it’s only once.

21. Take a vacation of your cell phone, internet, and TV once a year.

22. Don’t fill up on bread, no matter how good.

23. A handshake beats an autograph.

24. Don’t linger in the doorway. In or out.

25. If you choose to go in drag, don’t sell yourself short.

26. If you want to know what makes you unique, sit for a caricature.

27. Never get your hair cut the day of a special event.

28. Be mindful of what comes between you and the Earth. Always buy good shoes, tires, and sheets.

29. Never eat lunch at your desk if you can avoid it.

30. When you’re with new friends, don’t just talk about old friends.

31. Eat lunch with the new kids.

32. When traveling, keep your wits about you.

33. It’s never too late for an apology.

34. Don’t pose with booze.

35. If you have the right of way, take it.

36. You don’t get to choose your own nickname.

37. When you marry someone, remember you marry their entire family.

38. Never push someone off a dock.

39. Under no circumstances should you ask a woman if she’s pregnant.

40. It’s not enough to be proud of your ancestry; live up to it.

41. Don’t make a scene.

42. When giving a thank you speech, short and sweet is best.

43. Know when to ignore the camera.

44. Never gloat.

45. Invest in good luggage.

46. Make time for your mom on your birthday. It’s her special day, too.

47. When opening presents, no one likes a good guesser.

48. Sympathy is a crutch, never fake a limp.

49. Give credit. Take blame.

50. Suck it up every now and again.

51. Never be the last one in the pool.

52. Don’t stare.

53. Address everyone that carries a firearm professionally.

54. Stand up to bullies. You’ll only have to do it once.

55. If you’ve made your point, stop talking.

56. Admit it when you’re wrong.

57. If you offer to help don’t quit until the job is done.

58. Look people in the eye when you thank them.

59. Thank the bus driver.

60. Never answer the phone at the dinner table.

61. Forgive yourself for your mistakes.

62. Know at least one good joke.

63. Don’t boo. Even the ref is somebody’s son.

64. Know how to cook one good meal.

65. Learn to drive a stick shift.

66. Be cool to younger kids. Reputations are built over a lifetime.

67. It’s okay to go to the movies by yourself.

68. Dance with your mother/father.

69. Don’t lose your cool. Especially at work.

70. Always thank the host.

71. If you don’t understand, ask before it’s too late.

72. Know the size of your boy/girlfriend’s clothes.

73. There is nothing wrong with a plain t-shirt.

74. Be a good listener. Don’t just wait for your turn to talk.

75. Keep your word.

76. In college, always sit in the front. You’ll stand out immediately.

77. Carry your mother’s bags. She carried you for nine months.

78. Be patient with airport security. They’re just doing their jobs.

79. Don’t be the talker in a movie.

80. The opposite sex likes people who shower.

81. You are what you do, not what you say.

82. Learn to change a tire.

83. Be kind. Everyone has a hard fight ahead of them.

84. An hour with grandparents is time well spent. Ask for advice when you need it.

85. Don’t litter.

86. If you have a sister, get to know her boyfriend. Your opinion is important.

87. You won’t always be the strongest or the fastest. But you can be the toughest.

88. Never call someone before 9am or after 9pm.

89. Buy the orange properties in Monopoly.

90. Make the little things count.

91. Always wear a bra at work.

92. There is a fine line between looking sultry and slutty. Find it.

93. You’re never too old to need your mom.

94. Ladies, if you make the decision to wear heels on the first date, commit to keeping them on and keeping your trap shut about how much your feet kill.

95. Know the words to your national anthem.

96. Your dance moves might not be the best, but I promise making a fool of yourself is more fun then sitting on the bench alone.

97. Smile at strangers.

98. Make goals.

99. Being old is not dictated by your bedtime.

100. If you have to fight, punch first and punch hard.

By

a high school teacher’s list of 100 wisest words (via daxxxx)

Sounds like a teacher I would have loved to have had as a student.

(via anhmdo)

Reblogged from science-in-a-jar  3,618 notes
geneticist:

Aqua regia, literally meaning “King’s water”, is a highly corrosive mixture of acids; it is the only mixture of acids that can dissolve gold.
Hungarian chemist George de Hevesy dissolved the nobel prizes of his peers in aqua regia during the German invasion of Denmark in WWII to prevent Nazis from looting the prizes. He placed the liquid solution of gold and aqua regia in plain sight where it was overlooked. After the war had ended, de Hevesy returned to precipitate the gold out of the mixture. He then returned the gold back to the Nobel Foundation where it was then cast back into its original shape. (img)

geneticist:

Aqua regia, literally meaning “King’s water”, is a highly corrosive mixture of acids; it is the only mixture of acids that can dissolve gold.

Hungarian chemist George de Hevesy dissolved the nobel prizes of his peers in aqua regia during the German invasion of Denmark in WWII to prevent Nazis from looting the prizes. He placed the liquid solution of gold and aqua regia in plain sight where it was overlooked. After the war had ended, de Hevesy returned to precipitate the gold out of the mixture. He then returned the gold back to the Nobel Foundation where it was then cast back into its original shape. (img)

Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove  44 notes
scienceyoucanlove:


Sea Urchin, a prickly-looking marine animal, spherical in shape and covered with long movable spines. It somewhat resembles a hedgehog and is sometimes called the “hedgehog of the sea.” Sea urchins are found on the ocean bottom, usually near rocky shores. Sea urchins may be brown, black, purple, green, white, or red. Most are about two to four inches (5 to 10 cm) in diameter, including the spines.
In addition to its spines, the sea urchin also has pedicellariae (three-jawed pincers atop slender stalks) and tiny tube feet projecting from its body surface. The movable spines (which in some species are solid and in others hollow and filled with poison) are used for locomotion and protection. The pedicellariae (which in some species contain poison glands) are used for defense and for cleaning the body by removing larval animals and small crustaceans. The tube feet are hollow, muscular projections ending in suckers. They are flexible and can be extended beyond the spines to grip objects on the ocean floor.
The sea urchin feeds on seaweed and other organic matter. On its undersurface is a mouth with five strong teeth used in feeding. Some sea urchins bore holes with their teeth in rocks along the shore and then use the rocks as hiding places. Sea urchins reproduce sexually by means of eggs and sperm. The eggs are used as food in many European and Asian countries.
Who Has the Longest Spines?
Sea urchins have the longest spines of any echinoderm. Like sea stars, sea urchins have spines over much of their bodies. Their spines stick out in all directions from their bony plates—just like little spears. And these spines are often poisonous.
A sea star and a sea urchin are easy to tell apart. A sea urchin doesn’t have arms. A sea star does. A sea urchin’s body is round like a ball, while a sea star’s body is mostly flat. A sea urchin also has something that no sea star has—teeth.
A sea urchin has bony plates just below its skin. These plates come together like the slices of an orange to form a tough skeleton called a test. Not all plates have spines attached to them, though. Every other plate has many tiny holes, through which a sea urchin can wiggle its tube feet.
Why Is the Sea Urchin a Master of Disguise?
Some sea urchins use their tube feet to pick up small rocks, bits of shell, or seaweed. The animals arrange these objects so that they cover their bodies. By doing this, a sea urchin can blend in with its surroundings. This is a form of camouflage (KAM uh flahzh). It helps the sea urchin hide from enemies.
Like most other spiny-skinned animals, sea urchins use their tube feet to move along the ocean floor. But sea urchins also use their spines to help them get around.
A sea urchin sometimes squeezes into a hole between rocks. If a hole is too small, a sea urchin will use its teeth and spines to make it bigger. By carving out a bigger hole, a sea urchin can make its own little home. And it’s usually a home that’s too small for unwelcome visitors, such as sea stars and other enemies.
Sea urchins belong to the class Echinoidea.
source 
photo caption: A nontoxic dye highlights water currents surrounding sea urchins (Astropyga sp.) off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These small, spiny echinoderms are found in oceans all over the world.
photo source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Sea Urchin, a prickly-looking marine animal, spherical in shape and covered with long movable spines. It somewhat resembles a hedgehog and is sometimes called the “hedgehog of the sea.” Sea urchins are found on the ocean bottom, usually near rocky shores. Sea urchins may be brown, black, purple, green, white, or red. Most are about two to four inches (5 to 10 cm) in diameter, including the spines.

In addition to its spines, the sea urchin also has pedicellariae (three-jawed pincers atop slender stalks) and tiny tube feet projecting from its body surface. The movable spines (which in some species are solid and in others hollow and filled with poison) are used for locomotion and protection. The pedicellariae (which in some species contain poison glands) are used for defense and for cleaning the body by removing larval animals and small crustaceans. The tube feet are hollow, muscular projections ending in suckers. They are flexible and can be extended beyond the spines to grip objects on the ocean floor.

The sea urchin feeds on seaweed and other organic matter. On its undersurface is a mouth with five strong teeth used in feeding. Some sea urchins bore holes with their teeth in rocks along the shore and then use the rocks as hiding places. Sea urchins reproduce sexually by means of eggs and sperm. The eggs are used as food in many European and Asian countries.

Who Has the Longest Spines?

Sea urchins have the longest spines of any echinoderm. Like sea stars, sea urchins have spines over much of their bodies. Their spines stick out in all directions from their bony plates—just like little spears. And these spines are often poisonous.

A sea star and a sea urchin are easy to tell apart. A sea urchin doesn’t have arms. A sea star does. A sea urchin’s body is round like a ball, while a sea star’s body is mostly flat. A sea urchin also has something that no sea star has—teeth.

A sea urchin has bony plates just below its skin. These plates come together like the slices of an orange to form a tough skeleton called a test. Not all plates have spines attached to them, though. Every other plate has many tiny holes, through which a sea urchin can wiggle its tube feet.

Why Is the Sea Urchin a Master of Disguise?

Some sea urchins use their tube feet to pick up small rocks, bits of shell, or seaweed. The animals arrange these objects so that they cover their bodies. By doing this, a sea urchin can blend in with its surroundings. This is a form of camouflage (KAM uh flahzh). It helps the sea urchin hide from enemies.

Like most other spiny-skinned animals, sea urchins use their tube feet to move along the ocean floor. But sea urchins also use their spines to help them get around.

A sea urchin sometimes squeezes into a hole between rocks. If a hole is too small, a sea urchin will use its teeth and spines to make it bigger. By carving out a bigger hole, a sea urchin can make its own little home. And it’s usually a home that’s too small for unwelcome visitors, such as sea stars and other enemies.

Sea urchins belong to the class Echinoidea.

source 

photo caption: A nontoxic dye highlights water currents surrounding sea urchins (Astropyga sp.) off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These small, spiny echinoderms are found in oceans all over the world.

photo source 

Reblogged from academicatheism  115 notes

An important scientific innovation rarely makes its way by gradually winning over and converting its opponents. What does happen is that its opponents gradually die out, and that the growing generation is familiarized with the ideas from the beginning. By

Max Planck

(via sagansense)

Reblogged from maccaughanc  698 notes
futurescope:

PopSci: How It Works - A 3-D Printer For Liver Tissue

Step 1: Engineers load one syringe with a bio-ink (A) made up of spheroids that each contain tens of thousands of parenchymal liver cells and a second syringe with a bio-ink (B) containing non-parenchymal liver cells that bolster cellular development and a hydrogel that helps with extrusion.
Step 2: Software on a PC wired to the bioprinter instructs a stepper motor attached to the robotic arm to move and lower the pump head (C) with the second syringe, which begins printing a mold. The mold looks like three hexagons arranged in a honeycomb pattern.
Step 3: A matchbox-size triangulation sensor (D) sitting beside the printing surface tracks the tip of each syringe as it moves along the x-, y-, and z- axes. Based on this precise location data, the software determines where the first syringe should be positioned.
Step 4: The robotic arm lowers the pump head (E) with the first syringe, which fills the honeycomb with parenchymal cells.
Step 5: Engineers remove the well plate­ (F)—which contains up to 24 completed microtissues, each approximately 250 microns thick­—and place it in an incubator. There, the cells continue fusing to form the complex matrix of a liver tissue.

[more]

futurescope:

PopSci: How It Works - A 3-D Printer For Liver Tissue

Step 1: Engineers load one syringe with a bio-ink (A) made up of spheroids that each contain tens of thousands of parenchymal liver cells and a second syringe with a bio-ink (B) containing non-parenchymal liver cells that bolster cellular development and a hydrogel that helps with extrusion.

Step 2: Software on a PC wired to the bioprinter instructs a stepper motor attached to the robotic arm to move and lower the pump head (C) with the second syringe, which begins printing a mold. The mold looks like three hexagons arranged in a honeycomb pattern.

Step 3: A matchbox-size triangulation sensor (D) sitting beside the printing surface tracks the tip of each syringe as it moves along the x-, y-, and z- axes. Based on this precise location data, the software determines where the first syringe should be positioned.

Step 4: The robotic arm lowers the pump head (E) with the first syringe, which fills the honeycomb with parenchymal cells.

Step 5: Engineers remove the well plate­ (F)—which contains up to 24 completed microtissues, each approximately 250 microns thick­—and place it in an incubator. There, the cells continue fusing to form the complex matrix of a liver tissue.

[more]

Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove  404 notes
scienceyoucanlove:

Polychaete Worm
Photograph courtesy NIWA    
Don’t let the rainbow glow fool you. This polychaete worm-found 3,900 feet (1,200 meters) down on the muddy seafloor off northern New Zealand—is a ferocious predator, with jaws that project à la the Alien movie monster.
Scientists spotted the creature—and many others—during a three-week expedition this spring throughout four deep-sea regions in the volcano-rich Kermadec Ridge.
Covering 3,800 square miles (9,840 square kilometers), the study area included undersea mountains, continental slopes, canyons, and hydrothermal vents-areas where undersea volcanoes release hot water and gases.
The “exciting” survey turned up several known species, from stalked barnacles to giant mussels, as well as potential new ones, biologist Malcolm Clark said by email.
"Overall, the survey confirmed our belief that the biological communities of the four deep-sea habitats would be different," added Clark, who led the voyage for New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research.
The research also further illuminated the deep sea, which is “to an extent, out of sight and out of mind,” he said.
"In order to ensure that deep-sea ecosystems do not suffer too much damage from things like bottom trawling or mineral extraction, we need to know what animals occur there, and how vulnerable they are to impact."
(See "Pictures: ‘Supergiant,’ Shrimp-Like Beasts Found in Deep Sea.")
—Christine Dell’Amore
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Polychaete Worm

Photograph courtesy NIWA    

Don’t let the rainbow glow fool you. This polychaete worm-found 3,900 feet (1,200 meters) down on the muddy seafloor off northern New Zealand—is a ferocious predator, with jaws that project à la the Alien movie monster.

Scientists spotted the creature—and many others—during a three-week expedition this spring throughout four deep-sea regions in the volcano-rich Kermadec Ridge.

Covering 3,800 square miles (9,840 square kilometers), the study area included undersea mountains, continental slopes, canyons, and hydrothermal vents-areas where undersea volcanoes release hot water and gases.

The “exciting” survey turned up several known species, from stalked barnacles to giant mussels, as well as potential new ones, biologist Malcolm Clark said by email.

"Overall, the survey confirmed our belief that the biological communities of the four deep-sea habitats would be different," added Clark, who led the voyage for New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research.

The research also further illuminated the deep sea, which is “to an extent, out of sight and out of mind,” he said.

"In order to ensure that deep-sea ecosystems do not suffer too much damage from things like bottom trawling or mineral extraction, we need to know what animals occur there, and how vulnerable they are to impact."

(See "Pictures: ‘Supergiant,’ Shrimp-Like Beasts Found in Deep Sea.")

—Christine Dell’Amore

source